Drill a pair of 3/8" holes in each end of the short stretchers, just over half of the depth of the dowels, using a brad-pointed bit. These stretchers already have a groove running their length, centered on the bottom edge. Precise placement isn't necessary, but keeping track of which part is which is. We need a hole in each end of each stretcher. Take care to keep these holes square, you don't want them running at angles.
Put the upper panel of MDF on your glue-up surface, bottom side up. Put the bottom panel of MDF on your other surface, bottom side down. (The panel with the holes drilled in it is the bottom panel, and the side that has the your layout diagram on it is the bottom side.) Chuck up in your drill the appropriate driver bit for the screws your using. Make sure you have a freshly-charged battery, and crank the speed down and the torque way down. You don't want to over-tighten the screws, MDF strips easily.
TOH has showed you how to make a toy chest with your kids before, but if you don't feel like cutting the wood yourself, opt for a kit like the one for this beautiful cherry chest. The kit comes with pre-cut pieces and all the hardware you need. Like many toy chests out there, the closed lid can also function as a bench seat, and the hinges are designed to prevent little fingers from getting caught. This model is available in three different finishes.
You don’t need a fully equipped shop to enjoy woodworking! In this class, you will learn to design, make, and finish a unique wood box. With an emphasis on tool safety and material exploration, we will use a combination of power tools and hand tools to make boxes of all shapes and sizes. Beginning with a solid block of wood, you will learn how to lay out, cut, sculpt, and reassemble the block into the form of a box. Demonstrated techniques will include hidden hinges, small drawers, pull knobs, and fitted lids, as well as texturing, carving, burning, painting, and finishing. Suitable for beginning and intermediate students, all materials provided.
Put the countertop on the base, put the MDF on top of the countertop, and line up the marks you drew on each end of the MDF with the countertop below it. When you have it lined up, clamp things down, and route the edge of the MDF using a 1-1/2" or longer flush-trim bit, with the depth adjusted so the bearing rides on the countertop. I clamped a couple of scraps of doubled MDF at each end to give the router base something extra to ride on at the ends.

I used the factory edge of the half-panel of hardboard as a guide for cutting the ply. I wanted to cut a 5-1/2" strip, and my saw cuts 4-1/2" from the edge of the shoe, so I wanted the edge of the hardboard 10" from the edge of the ply. So I set my combination square to 10", and used it to mechanically set the distance. Hint - if you need two things to be precisely the same length, try to avoid measuring them separately. Use some mechanical mechanism for setting the distance.


In ancient times, the woodworker’s bench consisted of a plank or split log with four splayed legs. Descendants of those benches are manufactured today, usually with a top of hardwood slabs glued together. The norm nowadays is four straight legs supporting the bulk above, often with braces and a shelf below. Despite the improvements, the linkage to Greek and Roman antecedents is still evident.
If you bought this superb polished table in a store, it would cost you a fortune, but our detailed instructions will help you make one for less than $100. And it looks like highly polished stone, but no-one would know it’s actually made from concrete with a wooden base. Also, you can embellish the top with leaf prints, like the table shown here, or personalize it with glass or mosaic tiles or imprints of seashells.
It has been a while since I have posted last, but I do have a question I am pondering. A close family friend has offered to buy me a shed (16 x 12). It looks nice. Double doors, two front windows, vinly siding, and hopefully a ridge vent. Currently I am based in my basement with enough room for my Rigid table saw, bandsaw workbench, some cabinets with very little room for my hand tools, so I used a wall with peg board, and my jointer. My dust collection hangs on the wall as well. (I am being moved outside to free up space in the basement) It is very cramped, but it works. My question is, do wood shops work outside? I know to take precautions of moisture and heat (insulation, dehumidifier, heat for cold season, and so on) but how often to shed workshops work out? Anyone have any ideas on how to keep my tools safe and secondly, does 16 x 12 sound like enough room? Please, I would love some friendly advice.
Foundations of Woodworking runs every fall (September - December) and winter (January-March). The application process for each session opens 9 months in advance of the course start date. Applications will be considered for registration in the order in which they are received. There is no fee for applying. Accepted applicants will be invited to register. We ask for a deposit of $200 at the time of registration to ensure your place in the class. 
First, cut one long edge. Second, cut a short edge, making sure it's square to the long edge you just cut. Clamp both pieces of the edging you'll be using along the long edge you've cut, and measure the width of the base plus 1/4-1/2", mark that, and then lay out a line through the mark that is square to the end you've cut, then cut along the line. Finally, cut the remaining short edge square to both long edges. (The length of the top doesn't need to precisely match anything, so we don't need to bother with clamping the trim before measuring.)
As I was handling the 2x4's, during the routing, I realized that I really wouldn't be happy with the look of the bench, if it were made from these unfinished boards. They had stamps, pencil marks, and more importantly, incipient splinters left by the saw, none of which I wanted. And I was remembering what other shop furniture made from unfinished pine had looked like, after a few years in the grime of a shop.
My bench is MY BENCH. In other words, it’s a thing of evolutionary beauty. I built the top 10 years before deciding on and designing the base. I spared no absurdity. It is supremely stout and the much maligned drawers are accessible from either side. The larger drawers have dust lids and can be extended to provide support for large workpieces or as a step for climbing on top of the bench. The top alone weighs more than most Roubos. So NYAH! Did I mention that I designed it to fit in with the Arts & Crafts vernacular? Who said you can’t build your bench to be furniture? Beautiful as well as useful shop furniture? Just sayin…
The tutorial that I am sharing here was written by someone who built this pallet art just to improve the value of a property they wanted to sell fast and they succeed in it. So you can imagine how wonderful this item must look like. I am assuming you do not just want to make this beautiful pallet art so that you can also sell your property easily. Well, whatever your reasons are, this beauty is able to attract anyone who visits your house.
Learn the basics of woodworking with simple hands-on projects to build your confidence and skills. Each lesson in this class explores an area of woodworking that will form the building blocks of all future woodworking projects you undertake. Keeping the average DIY'er in mind, this entire class is conducted using basic handheld power tools, with no fancy fixed tools like table saws, lathes, planers, or drill presses.
Do you want to use an oil stain, a gel stain, a water-based stain or a lacquer stain? What about color? Our ebook tells you what you really need to know about the chemistry behind each wood stain, and what to expect when you brush, wipe or spray it on. It’s a lot simpler than you think! This is the comprehensive guide to all the varieties of stain you will find at the store and how to use them.
I don't like to be ignored either. I came the same day Mahndo left after waiting 30-45 mins. I left a note with name and number but no one even called me back. I was completely ignored. I found a class over at The Corona Heritage Park in Corona instead. Their instructor answers when I call or text. Nice to be acknowledged! Going to finish beginning and take advantage of the key access in their intermediate class.
The end vise will have both jaws made out of 1-1/2" thick oak. The front vise has its moving jaw made of 1-1/2" oak, but uses the edge of the bench as its stationary jaw. So while for the end vise, if we mount it lower, we can make both the jaws deeper to compensate, for the front vise we cannot, so we want it mounted as close to the edge of the bench as possible.
I made a low table out of a couple of step-stools, my hollow-core door, and one of the MDF panels that would eventually form part of my top. I was concerned that any oil that dripped on the door might interfere with its glue adhesion, when I finally get around to the project for which I'd purchased it. The top side of the top sheet of MDF, though, I planned to oil, anyway. (Ditto for the bottom side of the bottom sheet.
The Cape Ann Shed was designed with coastal New England in mind. So yard work may feel like you’re actually on vacation. From Cape Cod to the beaches of Maine, you will find a Post Woodworking Cape Ann shed adorning the yards of thousands of homes. It’s a popular style with our customers – whether they make their home by street or by sea. An affordable choice for an outdoor structure, the Cape Ann brings functional elements with nautical appeal.
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