Cerritos College Woodworking, one of the finest woodworking schools in Southern California, offers classes in furniture making, cabinetmaking, CNC woodworking, and related topics.  Cerritos is the school for you, whether your goal is to acquire new knowledge, gain confidence in or improve your skills, enter the field of professional woodworking, or develop a rewarding hobby.
Students will make two pens at the lathe, one of solid wood and one of your own design built up from several pieces of wood. Since turning pens is a quick process, we will have time to teach you how to choose woods, how to prepare and mount wood on the lathe, and several of the more popular finishes. We will cover safe operation of a lathe, demonstrate how to use common woodworking tools, practice tool sharpening techniques, and discuss options for what kind of lathe you might want in the future, from a small pen lathe to more robust machines that can handle much bigger projects. Bring clothes that can get dirty.
I love the opportunity Community Woodshop provides to take advantage of the tools, high-end equipment and hands on skills they'll assist you with when working with woods and metals. I'm not too sure about the Community part because I'd probably not come back because of the distance, however I do recommend learning to build shit on your own rather than paying a hefty price for the same materials that all furniture and fixtures and most jewelry are made of. They offer a wide variety of classes that teach you skills to build different items and use different tools.
Out of all the shed books I have read, this book stays by my side while I hammer in the yard. The book is well written by what appears to be a non professional book writer (A Good Thing). It reads as if you are getting advise in laymans terms from your neighbor "The Craftsman", a welcome change from the DIY books, that assume a level of expertese. The level of detail is high and discusses gotcha's, advise, and trade "secrets" that could have only come from years of personal experience building sheds.
A couple nice qualities about this bench include the weight and vice capacities. The weight capacity of this bench is 330 pounds which is decent, though it will not wow you too much. The vice, on the other hand, provides a 7” capacity which is tied for the most on our list. That said, there is only a single vice, and it is not able to be repositioned. This can make things a bit frustrating for lefties as it is a right-handed configuration.
Windsor Design is an interesting brand in that it is not actually its own company. Instead, Windsor Design is one of the in-house brands sold by Harbor Freight. While it may be a store brand, that should not dissuade you at all as Harbor Freight is known for selling some of the best products available for all fields of construction. Granted, this may not strictly be the best table available, but it does provide a solid mix of features to make it a good value.
Happy bench building folks. I hope you make it your own and not worry too much about what someone else thinks it should be. Use the rules as a guideline, they have validity, but make it your own in the end. If the rules fit you that’s great, if they don’t quite fit you then make it to fit yourself. It’s you using it, not some guy making a nice living off of telling you how he thinks you should do it. One size does not fit all. Never has, never will.
Much like the dimensions of a bench’s tabletop, the weight capacity will similarly affect what size of projects you can work on with your bench. A common weight capacity sits between 220 to 250 pounds. While this is okay, it will limit some heavier projects. Ideally, you should shoot for 300 pounds, though some benches can offer 500 pounds of weight capacity or more.
This particular tray is made using reclaimed barn wood but the author of the project Beyond The Picket Fence surprised everyone with one fact: reclaimed barn wood has often some areas turned pink due to cow urine. If you check the project more closely, you’ll also notice some areas of the tray being almost bright pink. That’s something you don’t see every day!
I don't like to be ignored either. I came the same day Mahndo left after waiting 30-45 mins. I left a note with name and number but no one even called me back. I was completely ignored. I found a class over at The Corona Heritage Park in Corona instead. Their instructor answers when I call or text. Nice to be acknowledged! Going to finish beginning and take advantage of the key access in their intermediate class.
Stan Beckworth began his woodworking career in 1983. His wide experience in woodworking enables him to teach as a practicing master craftsman. He began woodworking because of a desire to work with his hands and pass some hand skills to his children. Some of the classes he teaches are the Finishing class, Relief Carving class, Foundational Classes and the Advanced Furniture courses, such as the Chest of Drawers and Rocking Chair classes. Stan has spent a lot of time learning about furniture finishes, as well as relief carving, studying with Mary May, a renowned woodcarver in South Carolina. When Stan isn’t teaching, he runs a small remodeling business at his home and builds and refinishes furniture for different clients. He has been commissioned to make furniture for several congressmen as well as refinishing furniture for past presidents. ”Being able to pass on practical skills that are useful for everyday application is what I love to do.”

This is another example of small woodwork projects that require good time and woodworking skills. This item is built using multiple wooden parts. Each part is shaped in a specific design and then all parts are attached together to make the final TV set. I have never tried building this one, mostly because I don’t own an iPhone, but also because making this item is not an easy task. By the way, it works fine with all kinds of phones.
I am new to woodworking. I'm learning as I go along, and I'm documenting as I learn, in the hope of being helpful to other novices. On the range from slap-dash to deliberate, my method is definitely on the deliberate side. If you have enough experience to be confident in using techniques that are more time-efficient, go for it. The techniques I'm using are those I thought least likely to go wrong, not those that would produce a product in the shortest time or at the lowest cost. You'll notice that I made a number of mistakes, spent considerable time on work I later determined to be unnecessary, and in a number of cases I used different techniques at the end than I did at the beginning. These are all the result of learning. I thought it would be better to demonstrate how I made errors, and how I corrected them, than to provide a set of instructions that presented the false impression that everything went together perfectly.
Be careful. Single 24x60" sheets of 3/4" MDF are pretty easy to lift. A doubled sheet is manageable. The countertop - 24x72" panel of 1-1/2" oak - weighs something over 100 pounds. It takes real care to lift safely. The joined top - 3" thick of oak and MDF - is past the range that can be lifted safely by one person. Don't try. Get a friend to help, or rig a block-and-tackle.
The tutorial that I am sharing here was written by someone who built this pallet art just to improve the value of a property they wanted to sell fast and they succeed in it. So you can imagine how wonderful this item must look like. I am assuming you do not just want to make this beautiful pallet art so that you can also sell your property easily. Well, whatever your reasons are, this beauty is able to attract anyone who visits your house.
Regardless of which type of screw you use, you'll need to flip the panel and use a countersink drill to on all of the exit holes. Drilling MDF leaves bumps, the countersink bit will remove them, and will create a little bit of space for material drawn up by the screw from the second sheet of MDF. You want to remove anything that might keep the two panels from mating up flat. I set a block plane to a very shallow bite and ran it over what was left of the bumps and over the edges. The edges of MDF can be bulged by by sawing or just by handling, and you want to knock that down.
Had a great experience at the shop! My schedule is hectic and unfortunately can't make the classes, but I did do a private lesson with Bob.  In one afternoon, we created two cutting boards.  Bob was very detailed with breaking down the process and using the machines.  Honestly didn't expect to make two cutting boards but Bob was proficient with time.  I got really comfortable using the machines especially the table saw.  I learned how to use the planer, jointer, miter saw, table saw, drill press, router, disk sander, and random orbital sander.  Really recommend folks that are interested in woodworking with little to no experience to take the Safety Orientation and the Cutting Board class or private lessons.  Looking forward to my next project at the shop!
Let me see if I can come up with a couple details. The table saw is a TS3660. So I have heard, this should be the center of your shop. My jointer is a 6 1/8" Jointer / Planer JP0610 which is 45 inches in length. My router table is the kreg router table that takes up a 24 x 32 inch footprint. My bench is roughly 30 x 70 inches and my bandsaw is 3' x3'. I have other tools as well such as a portable 12.5 Delta thickness planer in addition to a wall mounted dust collector. To add to the list, I am just about to get a 10 inch makita sliding compound miter saw. I can see how space will be eaten up quickly. Any ideas as to how arrange these tools in such a small shop? I will get pics a soon a I
With the top laying on the floor, bottom side up, the next step is to flip the base upside down, and attach it to the top. I followed Asa Christiana's design, in using s-clips. When I stopped by my local Woodcraft, though, they only had two packages of ten, so I didn't use as many as I would have, otherwise. For the top I put four on each side and two on each end. For the shelf I put three on each side and two on each end. If it turns out that I need more, I can always add more.
This is probably one the easiest woodworking projects you will find here. Although easy, a doormat is an equally important and useful item for households. As you can see in the image below, you will only need some 2X2 wooden boards and rope to build a simple doormat. This doormat is mostly useful for outdoor and porch. It will easily remove all the mud from your shoes with just one wipe. It is also very easy to clean and looks fabulous even if it is dirty.

The bench I will be describing differs from both of these in a couple of areas, the most significant of which is the top. Allen's top was made from three layers of 3/4" medium density fiberboard (MDF), topped and edged with 1/4" hardboard. Christiana's top was just two layers of 3/4" MDF. My top is two layers of 3/4" MDF edged with 1/2" oak and topped by a 1-1/2" thick edge-glued oak Ikea countertop. My top is more expensive in both time and money than either Christiana's or Allen's. If you're looking to build something fast and cheap, I'd recommend Allen's approach over Christiana's. The hardboard significantly increases the durability of the top.

The description below is an outline for how the course will proceed.  We intentionally maintain a level of flexibility in our curriculum to adapt and respond to the needs of each group of students depending on aptitude.  Each project has a basic standard of completion as well as design opportunities for elaboration and exploration of more advanced techniques.   Our instructors will guide you through projects as is best suited for your ability level.   
The Cape Ann Shed was designed with coastal New England in mind. So yard work may feel like you’re actually on vacation. From Cape Cod to the beaches of Maine, you will find a Post Woodworking Cape Ann shed adorning the yards of thousands of homes. It’s a popular style with our customers – whether they make their home by street or by sea. An affordable choice for an outdoor structure, the Cape Ann brings functional elements with nautical appeal.
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