Drill a pair of 3/8" holes in each end of the short stretchers, just over half of the depth of the dowels, using a brad-pointed bit. These stretchers already have a groove running their length, centered on the bottom edge. Precise placement isn't necessary, but keeping track of which part is which is. We need a hole in each end of each stretcher. Take care to keep these holes square, you don't want them running at angles.
If you bought this superb polished table in a store, it would cost you a fortune, but our detailed instructions will help you make one for less than $100. And it looks like highly polished stone, but no-one would know it’s actually made from concrete with a wooden base. Also, you can embellish the top with leaf prints, like the table shown here, or personalize it with glass or mosaic tiles or imprints of seashells.
Remove the jaws and route the edges that you could not route while they were still attached. Then use a roundover bit on all of the corners except the inner edge of the inner jaw of the end vise. Give everything a lite sanding, and apply Danish oil to the inner surfaces of the jaws. (By "inner surfaces", I mean those surfaces that will not be accessible when the vises are assembled - the inner surface of the inner jaw, that bolts to the bench, and the outer surfaces of the outer jaws, that bolt to the vise plates.)
This instructable shows how to build, with basic tools and readily-available lumber, a bench that provides most of the function of a traditional woodworker's workbench. I began with a design by Asa Christiana that was featured in the second season of finewoodworking.com's video series Getting Started in Woodworking. The project plans are available on their website.
to allow 9' at the peak, I like a "shed style" roof, but that may not fly in your HOA.I'd put double doors on or one large one, pour a slab, or use patio blocks then lay down Wolman. plywood for a floor, I would use foam insulating board everywhere I could, walls, floor and ceiling. A few bin type windows or sliders would let in light and fresh air. If you can't get away with your wiring idea, I would use a HD 30 amp twist lock extension cord with an "outside weatherproof outlet" mounted on the home professionally installed for code, 2- 8' long flouresent lights, and a 20 amp outlet inside for a heater and dehumidifier. Dehumidifiers draw about 5-6 amps. You might be better off with a small 6000 BTU window or wall mounted AC unit,( $100 on sale at the Depot), it will take the moisture out of the air and cool it as well in the summer. I'd use thin wall conduit around the shop with about 4 double duplex boxes. You may be able to bring 220v. in and then split into 2-120v circuits. If you make ANY dust in this confined space you must first catch it with a shop vac, then filter the air, and wear a mask. A bathroom ventilator fan would exchange the air and be quiet. A slab in front would allow sawing outside weather permitting. A roll up canopy over the door way would provide "shade" and rain protection. I know this sounds like a lot of work, but I know you can do it if you try. You can get plenty of "free" advice here and from an expert close to you. My neighbor enlisted the help of a handyman for building his 2 sheds and they became friends and did tool swaps and labor trades for time worked. My advice to you.. go 4 it! bill
The Cape Ann Shed was designed with coastal New England in mind. So yard work may feel like you’re actually on vacation. From Cape Cod to the beaches of Maine, you will find a Post Woodworking Cape Ann shed adorning the yards of thousands of homes. It’s a popular style with our customers – whether they make their home by street or by sea. An affordable choice for an outdoor structure, the Cape Ann brings functional elements with nautical appeal.
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