Not sure about Midwest but I have a 24 x 14 Game rm attached to my shop and I put a small window unit/heat pump in the wall. It stays comfortable all year round. It get really hot here and we had a several day in the 20's this winter but it's insulated well. That might not be as cold or as hot as in some places but the unit I haze does not run that often and has a low cost rating. I'm planning on putting a larger unit in the shop area even though I do like to work with the garage door open. The door is insulated so I can run A/c in there. Just my .02.
Another odd design feature of the Windsor Design is its dog holes. While this bench provides a variety of dog holes and even offers numerous pegs and dowels to go along with it, the dog holes are not spaced as closely or with as much variation as you see with many other benches. Ultimately, this means that smaller workpieces may not be able to use the dog holes and pegs as well.
Learn basic principles of working with wood while making your own carved wooden spoon. Topics covered include different types of wood, grain direction, carving, shaping, and food safe finishes. Through short demonstrations and lectures, we will use a combination of power and hand tools, exploring the material for its functionality as a creative medium. At the end of the workshop, students leave with a unique spoon, ready to use! All materials included.
Through demonstrations and practice you will learn how to build a Simple Table Top. Square wood using the Jointer, Planer and Table Saw, then learn how to use the Festool Domino Joiner to keep perfect registration during the glue up. This will be a group project where everyone will help build a single table top. The goal is to gain experience and confidence...
to allow 9' at the peak, I like a "shed style" roof, but that may not fly in your HOA.I'd put double doors on or one large one, pour a slab, or use patio blocks then lay down Wolman. plywood for a floor, I would use foam insulating board everywhere I could, walls, floor and ceiling. A few bin type windows or sliders would let in light and fresh air. If you can't get away with your wiring idea, I would use a HD 30 amp twist lock extension cord with an "outside weatherproof outlet" mounted on the home professionally installed for code, 2- 8' long flouresent lights, and a 20 amp outlet inside for a heater and dehumidifier. Dehumidifiers draw about 5-6 amps. You might be better off with a small 6000 BTU window or wall mounted AC unit,( $100 on sale at the Depot), it will take the moisture out of the air and cool it as well in the summer. I'd use thin wall conduit around the shop with about 4 double duplex boxes. You may be able to bring 220v. in and then split into 2-120v circuits. If you make ANY dust in this confined space you must first catch it with a shop vac, then filter the air, and wear a mask. A bathroom ventilator fan would exchange the air and be quiet. A slab in front would allow sawing outside weather permitting. A roll up canopy over the door way would provide "shade" and rain protection. I know this sounds like a lot of work, but I know you can do it if you try. You can get plenty of "free" advice here and from an expert close to you. My neighbor enlisted the help of a handyman for building his 2 sheds and they became friends and did tool swaps and labor trades for time worked. My advice to you.. go 4 it! bill

Frame making may look simple but it is a skill that escapes many. For a frame to properly do its job it has to be perfect, any mistake can be a distraction that takes away from the artwork it surrounds. This class will focus on skills essential to making square or rectangular frames. Skill building concepts will include how to break down and mill...


With the inner jaw fastened to the bench, I used the router to flush-trim the jaw to the benchtop, across the top and down the sides adjacent to the top (stopping short of the discontinuity between the top and the legs). I'd thought this would be the best way to match up the jaw against the top, but I'd not do it this way again. It was very difficult to hold the router tight against the face of the jaw, and the result was a surface that wasn't as even as I had hoped.
Our programs prepare our students to open their own woodworking business or become employed by a high-end woodworking related business. We currently offer an Associate of Science Degree as well as a Certificate of Achievement in 8 different Program Areas. Students may also take coursework to complete a Certificate. Our courses range from Furniture Design and Instrument Making to Production Cabinetmaking.   Our graduates are highly employable with the diversity of courses available.
You don’t need a fully equipped shop to enjoy woodworking! In this class, you will learn to design, make, and finish a unique wood box. With an emphasis on tool safety and material exploration, we will use a combination of power tools and hand tools to make boxes of all shapes and sizes. Beginning with a solid block of wood, you will learn how to lay out, cut, sculpt, and reassemble the block into the form of a box. Demonstrated techniques will include hidden hinges, small drawers, pull knobs, and fitted lids, as well as texturing, carving, burning, painting, and finishing. Suitable for beginning and intermediate students, all materials provided.
The hacksaw will often damage the last thread when it cuts. Running a nut off the end will fix this. You'll have to run the nut all the way down from the other end. This doesn't take long, if you chuck up the rod in your drill and let it do the work. Hold the rod vertically, with the drill pointing down, and just hold on to the nut enough to keep it from spinning.
The front edge of a woodworker’s bench is usually lined with square holes positioned at regular intervals. These holes hold bench dogs and holdfast clamps in place for securing work pieces. Beneath the top of the bench, some cabinetmaker models feature single storage drawers, others several drawers and even cupboards incorporated into a case-like base.
As I was handling the 2x4's, during the routing, I realized that I really wouldn't be happy with the look of the bench, if it were made from these unfinished boards. They had stamps, pencil marks, and more importantly, incipient splinters left by the saw, none of which I wanted. And I was remembering what other shop furniture made from unfinished pine had looked like, after a few years in the grime of a shop.
Anyway, I'd like to know if I'll be able to keep (EDIT: and use) all my tools out there (current and planned) without having the shed become a rust-bucket for the tools and machinery inside. I'll have a 10" contractor's saw out there along with a drill press, a sanding belt, a router & router table, and lots and lots of old tools that I inherited from my Granddad years ago. I live in the Seattle area, so it rains A LOT. But I'm hoping that with the proper ventilation I can keep the tools in the shed dry.
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