Evidence of a removed fireplace makes it clear that the woodworkers were doing tasks that required warmth, like using glue. The type of glue used during that time had to be heated to a certain temperature. Bill Flynt, a former colleague of Garrison, tested the wood of the shop and found that it is second- or third-generation wood, meaning that New Englanders had already cut down and replanted lots of trees by that time.

Synopsis: No room in the garage? Basement not an option? Consider what Ken St. Onge did when he needed shop space: He bought a prefabricated shed and converted it into his full-time woodshop. Because a pre-built shed doesn’t need a cement foundation and is built in a factory, it’s much less expensive than building an addition or stand-alone shop on your property. It can have taller ceilings than a garage and bigger doors than a basement, both big pluses for a woodworker. You can put a shed just about anywhere, too. Here’s a soup to nuts look at Ken’s experience, so you can gauge whether a shop in a shed is right for you.
This is not exactly a tutorial, but a guide to some really cool woodworking projects. Although we are not teaching you to make anything, we are always here to help. Feel free to ask your queries in the comments in case if you face any issue while working on any of these projects. Also, tell us how much you liked this article. Did you enjoy reading it? Did you work on any of these projects, and if yes, how was your experience? You are also welcome to share any images of your completed woodwork projects.
The front edge of a woodworker’s bench is usually lined with square holes positioned at regular intervals. These holes hold bench dogs and holdfast clamps in place for securing work pieces. Beneath the top of the bench, some cabinetmaker models feature single storage drawers, others several drawers and even cupboards incorporated into a case-like base.
Woodworking Workbenches are available in a variety of styles. Open Style Wood Workbenches feature a large work surface and a lower shelf. 2-1/4" thick maple top with maple plywood lower shelf. Open Style Wood Workbenches are available as a 2-station unit (28"W) or a 4-station unit (54"W). Open Style Auxiliary Workbenches are used for placement against walls. Shelf features a rear curb to keep contents in place. Solid maple top features angle iron front edge. Plywood shelf is open for maximum functionality. Solid maple legs. Environmentally-friendly UV finish. Units measure 24"D and are available in several lengths and heights. Mitre Box Benches ensure wood pieces are kept flat while mitres are cut. Bench is made using solid maple unit with environmentally-friendly UV finish. Holds a mitre saw up to 26"W and provides a 24" square work surface on both sides. Mitre Box Benches measure 33-3/4"H. Sheet Metal Workbenches are made with a 2-1/4" thick maple top and is protected on two long edges with 2" x 2" angle iron. Solid maple legs and stringers. Plywood shelves are designed to provide open storage of 30" metal sheets. Measures 40"D x 32"H and available in widths of 60" or 96".
We want to make these pieces square, and of identical length. Square is a matter of making sure the saw blade is square and that the cutting guide is square. The trick to getting the pieces of the same length is to clamp them together and to cut them all at once. For the 4x4's, that means making a rough cut in each first, so we have four pieces, each 3-4" longer than we need, from which we'll get our four legs.
The source above is not exactly a tutorial, but it gives you a basic idea of how the author built a Quirky Pallet Art to enhance the look of their old house. You can also find another tutorial at the link below. It shares a step by step procedure for making a wooden pallet sign. The final product is not exactly the same as the one above, but the basic idea is the same.

A couple nice qualities about this bench include the weight and vice capacities. The weight capacity of this bench is 330 pounds which is decent, though it will not wow you too much. The vice, on the other hand, provides a 7” capacity which is tied for the most on our list. That said, there is only a single vice, and it is not able to be repositioned. This can make things a bit frustrating for lefties as it is a right-handed configuration.
For one, the bench itself is a good size. While its width as a tad short at just over 1 ½’, the length is a great 5’ long. Even better, this bench is made out of birch wood. Birchwood is similar to beech in that it is strong but soft enough to prevent inadvertent dulling of your tools. However, birch has a bit of an advantage over beech in that it is not a porous which makes staining on the Windsor Design a more worry-free affair.
Before you start cutting or drilling the pieces that will make up the top, determine the layout of the top. This should include the dimensions of the MDF, the dimensions of the edging, the locations of the vises, and of the screws or bolts that will support the vises, and of all of the benchdog holes and of all of the drywall screws you will use to laminate the panels,
My advice? Don't do this. If you have jointer and a planer, use them. If you don't, seriously consider using dimensional lumber that has already been planed and sanded. If you are going to try to clean up construction lumber by hand, using a hand plane is a lot faster and more pleasant than using a belt sander. Except, of course, that to do a good job of planing a board you need a solid bench to hold the board, and you don't have a bench, yet.
Foundations of Woodworking runs every fall (September - December) and winter (January-March). The application process for each session opens 9 months in advance of the course start date. Applications will be considered for registration in the order in which they are received. There is no fee for applying. Accepted applicants will be invited to register. We ask for a deposit of $200 at the time of registration to ensure your place in the class. 
Before joining the top to the base, loosen the bolts and screws on the lower stretchers to create a little play in the leg posts. Align the top notches with the leg posts and tap the top into place with a hammer and piece of scrap wood, working evenly around the table until all leg posts are level with the tabletop. Tighten the lower stretchers and you’re done. A hefty thanks to Doug Merrill for this weighty idea.
The top is supported by the top ends of the legs and the top sides of the top stretchers. Stand your legs on end on a flat surface (like my door) and see if they wobble. If you have an end that isn't quite stable, use it as a foot, where the leveler will make it's flaws unimportant. Check the top edge of each stretcher for straightness. If one has a bit of a bow, use it for a lower stretcher. It's less critical that the shelf be well supported along its length.
I decided to make my own top out of white ash because I had access to a planer and jointer at my local college where I was taking an intro woodworking class. Trim and vice jaws are white ash as well. Everything else is built pretty much as jdege describes. A plunge router with a 3/4" spiral up bit really made quick work of the dog holes. Finished with Danish oil.
The reason I'd cut out the rectangles in the vise support was that I'd intended to put a benchdog hole through each, and I wanted the thickness of the top to be the same for all of the benchdog holes. Where I messed up was in not cutting out the ends, between the bolt tabs. I'd intended to put a benchdog hole through there, as well, but I'd forgotten to cut out the segments prior to glue0up.
They immediately tried 2 of the projects, and first found that the instructions were a little vague (so many similar sized/shaped pieces - it was difficult to sort them!). The glue included in the kit had separated, and was not usable - but basic wood glue, which we had on hand, worked just fine. The projects turned out great, and, the time spent working on them was priceless!
A shed is a great project to earn your sawdust legs on. It is just some very basic carpentry skills. You could build the whole thing with a circular saw, hammer, utility knife, pencil, and tape rule. Find a friend or relative that has some decent skills to help. You could do it in a weekend. Keep the size on a four foot increment to minimize wastee. I would recommend a 12 x 12 or a 12 x 16 if you can. If you don't want to cut any rafters (which is really a simple process), you can order small triangle shaped trusses for the roof from your local lumberyard. If you are using T1-11 for the sides, get the real plywood based stuff, no waferboard. Same thing for the floor, use plywood (treated if you like). Cedar for the trim, not pine. The visqueen underneath is a good idea. Insulate the walls inside to help temper temperature swings. Build overhanges into the roof all the way around, 12" is nice. These really are a fun project. You can add a small window with a flower box underneath to make it look a little homey too.
We have 4 newly expanded Classrooms, 3 state of the art labs with over $275,000 of new machinery, and $600,000 spent on new exhaust and compressed air systems. We have 4 new CNC production machines, a Haas VF-3 CNC Router and a NEWCNC 4×8 multi head machine and 2 Laguna IQ Routers. Even our shop stools (with cushioned backs) are brand new. We have new course offerings such as our Computer Design Sketchup Class and 8 new Certificate Programs you can choose from.
Get perfectly, consistently spaced and centered shelf-pin holes! Economical and practical, this jig can be used on assembled or unassembled cabinetry. Re-designed handle includes two storage compartments for self-centering bits! Ideal for adding shelves to new or existing cabinets. Drills holes either 1-7/16" or 2-1/2" from edge. Insert shelf pin in top or bottom position to extend jig for continuous drilling. Shelving Jigs measure 20" long Additional Self-Centering Bits available. 

The 84-906 fits this bill perfectly as the table offers all of the qualities and features that you would expect but does not truly blow you away with any of them. For instance, this bench is made out of rubberwood. This wood is decent in that it provides the strength you want, but it is also extremely porous and rough-grained. The porous nature would generally make it susceptible to rotting and staining, though the bench has been lacquered. The rough grain will potentially cause tools to dull over time if you do not regularly relacquer it.


Anyway, I'd like to know if I'll be able to keep (EDIT: and use) all my tools out there (current and planned) without having the shed become a rust-bucket for the tools and machinery inside. I'll have a 10" contractor's saw out there along with a drill press, a sanding belt, a router & router table, and lots and lots of old tools that I inherited from my Granddad years ago. I live in the Seattle area, so it rains A LOT. But I'm hoping that with the proper ventilation I can keep the tools in the shed dry.
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