This trade and technical college currently serves over 15,500 credit students from its campus in downtown Los Angeles. Through the Construction, Design and Manufacturing Department, full-time students can enroll in a daytime certificate or an Associate of Science program in cabinet and millwork. Evening programs for current craftspeople include a certificate program in construction technologies and an Associate of Arts in cabinetmaking and millwork that provide students with the skills they need to work in construction or manufacturing.

In each Practical Woodworking Class, the daily mix consists of intensive lecture, demonstration, and student practice lab time.  Lecture periods are interactive, informative, and intensive but are also an enjoyable experience.  Generally, each joinery and fabrication process is demonstrated in several ways to reach or achieve the same results.  For example, processes are first demonstrated with the use of hand tools. Next, the same joint or procedure is done with simple hand held power tools (such as the router). Then, the entire process is demonstrated with stationary equipment such as the table saw, drill press, and mortiser. Students choose whichever production method works best for them and is in keeping with their plan to equip a home workshop and/or around their existing home tooling.
I'm not kidding when I say that this shop has everything you need to make a project happen.  They are not only equipped but also some of the nicest people.  Supportive and, mostly, willing to help you with your project.  The idea is for you to do it on your own, but if you get stuck I have yet to see someone say, "no, figure it out on your own."  they are helpful and fair.  I love this place, and the people I have met there.
Out of all the shed books I have read, this book stays by my side while I hammer in the yard. The book is well written by what appears to be a non professional book writer (A Good Thing). It reads as if you are getting advise in laymans terms from your neighbor "The Craftsman", a welcome change from the DIY books, that assume a level of expertese. The level of detail is high and discusses gotcha's, advise, and trade "secrets" that could have only come from years of personal experience building sheds.

Having done all this, I'm not sure I'd do it this way again. It might well be faster to layout the positions with compass and straightedge directly onto the top. Either way, you'll want to use a scribe rather than a pencil. Scribe lines are hard to see, and impossible to photograph, but the scribe and compass points click into them, allowing a precision that pencils simply cannot match.
Do you want to use an oil stain, a gel stain, a water-based stain or a lacquer stain? What about color? Our ebook tells you what you really need to know about the chemistry behind each wood stain, and what to expect when you brush, wipe or spray it on. It’s a lot simpler than you think! This is the comprehensive guide to all the varieties of stain you will find at the store and how to use them.
Synopsis: No room in the garage? Basement not an option? Consider what Ken St. Onge did when he needed shop space: He bought a prefabricated shed and converted it into his full-time woodshop. Because a pre-built shed doesn’t need a cement foundation and is built in a factory, it’s much less expensive than building an addition or stand-alone shop on your property. It can have taller ceilings than a garage and bigger doors than a basement, both big pluses for a woodworker. You can put a shed just about anywhere, too. Here’s a soup to nuts look at Ken’s experience, so you can gauge whether a shop in a shed is right for you.
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