I decided to make my own top out of white ash because I had access to a planer and jointer at my local college where I was taking an intro woodworking class. Trim and vice jaws are white ash as well. Everything else is built pretty much as jdege describes. A plunge router with a 3/4" spiral up bit really made quick work of the dog holes. Finished with Danish oil.
Though the preschool had been using the woodworking shop for storage, not realizing its historic value, it’s still in remarkably good shape. The woodworking benches and tables are still in excellent condition. According to Garrison, the shop is filled with clues as to how it was used. Some benches were covered in paint while others bear saw marks, testifying to the variety of tasks that were performed there.
While a strict figure for the bench’s weight capacity is not available, a quick browse through their other stand and bench products shows a general weight capacity well above most other brands. As such, while we cannot say for certain that this bench provides the best weight capacity, it is more than likely that it the capacity is similar to the other products in the catalog.
When you have the other leg seated, the threaded rods will extend father than you want them to. You'll want to mark them so they can be cut to length. Place a washer and a nut on each threaded rod, and then tighten down the nut to pull everything tight. Depending upon the wrench you are using, and how much longer the rod is than it needs to be, you may find it necessary to stack up a number of washers, so that the nut is positioned where the wrench can operate on it.
I love the opportunity Community Woodshop provides to take advantage of the tools, high-end equipment and hands on skills they'll assist you with when working with woods and metals. I'm not too sure about the Community part because I'd probably not come back because of the distance, however I do recommend learning to build shit on your own rather than paying a hefty price for the same materials that all furniture and fixtures and most jewelry are made of. They offer a wide variety of classes that teach you skills to build different items and use different tools.
I can't recommend this place highly enough. As someone who wants to test the waters in the hobby of woodworking this is the perfect place. They have all of the tools you need to complete your project, and they are great with helping beginners. I began as a skeptical customer but the staff was super ready and willing to make sure we could rectify a misunderstanding.
It might not be the easiest project in this list, but if you already have some experience with wood cutting and joinery, it won’t be any hassle at all. Thanks to the extremely detailed instructions it shouldn’t really be a problem even if you’re not very familiar with woodworking. This could actually be a great project for refining your woodworking skills as a beginner!
I live in the second rainiest city in the country, Pensacola, so I am used to dealing with wet. I literally work out of my garage (read storage area, small woodwork area, washer/dryer...car? ). I wheel bigger tools and table out to the little covered area in front of the garage. I have an 8 x 10 aluminum shed that is strictly garden stuff storage. I mention this for two reasons.
Some tools required for this project are hole saw, drilling machine, pencil, tape measure, clamps, etc. This tutorial explains every step properly with images so that anyone can make a wooden sofa sleeve easily. Those, who prefer a video tutorial, can visit the below link to a YouTube video that illustrates the process of building a DIY Sofa Sleeve Cupholder.
It doesn't get much better than a day at the woodshop! I've taken several classes from cutting boards to turning vases. It is always fun and informative! All of the machines are top notch and the instructors are great! I've toyed with the idea of a membership but I think I'll take a couple more classes before doing so! I can't wait to see the new location! :)
Whether you want to build your own kitchen cabinets, a credenza for your dining room, or built in shelves for your bedroom you should have some basic cabinetry skills before getting started. There are so many options when designing and building cabinets: face frame vs. frameless; sliding vs. hinged doors; dovetails vs. rabbets; plywood vs. MDF; wood...
Anyway, I'd like to know if I'll be able to keep (EDIT: and use) all my tools out there (current and planned) without having the shed become a rust-bucket for the tools and machinery inside. I'll have a 10" contractor's saw out there along with a drill press, a sanding belt, a router & router table, and lots and lots of old tools that I inherited from my Granddad years ago. I live in the Seattle area, so it rains A LOT. But I'm hoping that with the proper ventilation I can keep the tools in the shed dry.
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