Post Woodworking’s Hampton shed is a major standout in design. The sleek farmers porch immediately draws the eye into its pure New England charm and provides the utility of shade and a cool place to sit and enjoy a cold one. Like all of our sheds, the six-panel doors which add to the structure’s aesthetic come standard. They’re made out of fiberglass to last through many decades out in the elements.

Flip the base upright, put the MDF on top of it, then use a straightedge to draw two straight lines joining the outside edges of the legs and extending the width of the MDF. I used the countertop as the straightedge. We cut it with our cutting guide, which is based on the factory edge of a sheet of 1/4" plywood, so it should be straight enough. Use a carpenter's square to transfer these lines onto the ends of the MDF.
The last thing is to semi-permanently attach the bolts for the vises. Given the amount of work necessary to get to the bolt heads, once the top is joined, I had intended to tighten them up so they wouldn't spin, and lock them that way with blue Loctite. (That's the strongest non-permanent grade.) That didn't work. What I found was that the bottoms of the countersinks weren't quite flat, and when I tightened the nuts down that far, the ends of the bolts would be pulled far enough out of alignment that the vise bases would no longer fit. In order for the vises to fit over the bolts, I had to leave the nuts loose enough that the bolts had a bit of wiggle - which meant that they were almost loose enough for the bolts to spin. So I put Loctite on the nuts, to keep them from unscrewing, and filled the countersinks with Liquid Nails, in hopes of keeping the bolts from spinning. I considered using epoxy, or a metal-epoxy mix like JB Weld, but I didn't have enough of either on hand. It seems to be working for now, though the real test won't be until I have to take the vises off.
The best thing about this wine rack is that it is very easy to build. All you need is the basic understanding of woodworking and a few tools to get started. You can modify your wine rack any way you want or build in a design or color different from this one. The basic steps to build a wooden wine rack are the same for all variants. I have included here the video tutorial that I followed in order to build myself a pallet wide rack.

I made a template by scribing two adjoining squares on a piece of MDF, using compass and straightedge, then marking each corner with a centerpunch, then drilling the points with a 1/16" bit. I find I'm always breaking small bits, so I picked up a couple of each size some months ago, and on looking I found I had three 1/16" bits, which worked fine for what I intended.

All glue & stain benches are made using a solid maple frame for lasting durability and strength. Side Clamp Benches are made specifically for bar clamps, and are used for gluing projects or clamp storage. Benches feature an open top with 17 sets of 3/4"W grooves that accept bar clamps measuring 3’ and over. Lower center rail is adaptable for storage of hand screws and C-clamps. Side clamp benches are available with or without a drip pan. Glue & Stain Benches are made with a 1-1/4” plywood top covered with heavy-coated galvanized steel. Bottom shelf has a 4” rear retaining lip. Glue and stain benches are available with or without casters. Limited Lifetime Warranty.
Timberframing is a traditional technique for building large and small structures using only wooden joinery. Prized for its structural integrity and beauty, as well as reliance on hand skills, timberframing is regaining popularity in modern applications. We will start with an overview of the different styles and aesthetics involved, and move into the specific tools that are used to lay out and cut the strong joints. Each student gets guided practice time making sample joints. We will all work together to make a small structure that can be raised on the final day of class.
The beauty of this project lies in the simplicity. All you need are 3 pieces of wood of your choice (though we must admit natural hardwoods will look incredible), sanding block, clamps, wood glue and finishing product. The hardest step of the whole tutorial is measuring – as always, measure 9 times, cut once! You wouldn’t want to finish your project and then realize it doesn’t have enough space to fit your DVD player, would you?
Aside from the privacy it offers, a latticework porch trellis is a perfect way to add major curb appeal to your home for $100 or less. The trellis shown here is made of cedar, but any decay-resistant wood like redwood, cypress or treated pine would also be a good option. Constructed with lap joints for a flat surface and an oval cutout for elegance, it’s a far upgrade from traditional premade garden lattice. As long as you have experience working a router, this project’s complexity lies mostly in the time it takes to cut and assemble. Get the instructions complete with detailed illustrations here.
First, cut one long edge. Second, cut a short edge, making sure it's square to the long edge you just cut. Clamp both pieces of the edging you'll be using along the long edge you've cut, and measure the width of the base plus 1/4-1/2", mark that, and then lay out a line through the mark that is square to the end you've cut, then cut along the line. Finally, cut the remaining short edge square to both long edges. (The length of the top doesn't need to precisely match anything, so we don't need to bother with clamping the trim before measuring.)
The decision to be made with respect to the end vise is whether the support plate should be mounted to on the inside or on the outside of the stretcher. Mounting the plate on the inside of the stretcher reduces the reach of the vise - it can't open as far, because the support plate is back from the edge by a couple of inches. But mounting the plate on the outside of the stretcher means that we need to add some support structure for the inner jaw of the vise, which the legs would have provided if we'd mounted the plate on the inside.
Let me see if I can come up with a couple details. The table saw is a TS3660. So I have heard, this should be the center of your shop. My jointer is a 6 1/8" Jointer / Planer JP0610 which is 45 inches in length. My router table is the kreg router table that takes up a 24 x 32 inch footprint. My bench is roughly 30 x 70 inches and my bandsaw is 3' x3'. I have other tools as well such as a portable 12.5 Delta thickness planer in addition to a wall mounted dust collector. To add to the list, I am just about to get a 10 inch makita sliding compound miter saw. I can see how space will be eaten up quickly. Any ideas as to how arrange these tools in such a small shop? I will get pics a soon a I
Something like this really does look like it would be a fun project. I guess I need to go out to the yard and use some stakes and brightly colored taped to mark off some different dimensions (12x8, 12x10, 12x12, etc.) to figure out just how big I can make this thing. If I'm building it myself, it'll be easy to keep the height right at the 9 foot limit.
Of course, I, on the other hand, with my Ikea oak countertop, probable went overboard in the other direction. Since I needed to trim the countertop to width,I figured I'd take off a couple of 1/2" strips to use for edging the MDF. I clamped the countertop to my bench base, and used the long cutting guide. I'd asked around for advice on cutting this large a piece of oak, and was told to try a Freud Diablo 40-tooth blade in my circular saw. I found one at my local home center, at a reasonable price, and it worked very well.
This is another example of small woodwork projects that require good time and woodworking skills. This item is built using multiple wooden parts. Each part is shaped in a specific design and then all parts are attached together to make the final TV set. I have never tried building this one, mostly because I don’t own an iPhone, but also because making this item is not an easy task. By the way, it works fine with all kinds of phones.
We have 4 newly expanded Classrooms, 3 state of the art labs with over $275,000 of new machinery, and $600,000 spent on new exhaust and compressed air systems. We have 4 new CNC production machines, a Haas VF-3 CNC Router and a NEWCNC 4×8 multi head machine and 2 Laguna IQ Routers. Even our shop stools (with cushioned backs) are brand new. We have new course offerings such as our Computer Design Sketchup Class and 8 new Certificate Programs you can choose from.
The hacksaw will often damage the last thread when it cuts. Running a nut off the end will fix this. You'll have to run the nut all the way down from the other end. This doesn't take long, if you chuck up the rod in your drill and let it do the work. Hold the rod vertically, with the drill pointing down, and just hold on to the nut enough to keep it from spinning.

Thanks Chris! I found this page while looking for a link to your e-mail address. I recently finished your erudite volumes on workbench design, and am about to embark on my own bench inspired by your take on the Holtzapffel design. As my vices and planer arrive, I’ve been agonizing over whether to use SYP or rough maple for the top. I don’t have a big budget, so all-maple is not an option. But after reading your ten tips here, I’ll stop agonizing — all SYP it is! This is, after all, my first of what I hope are at least several handmade benches. Your scholarship and craftsmanship are truly inspiring.

I had a similar experience with running electrical power to a shed. It turned out that I could build a 12x12 shed without a building permit as long as I did not run utilities, but getting a permit opened a whole new set of requirements that forbid me from having a shed at all. And when the nosey old woman next to me kept calling the building inspector on me, it was suggested that I could run an extension cord out to the shed anytime I wanted as long as it wasn’t fastened in a permanent manner.
×