Not sure about Midwest but I have a 24 x 14 Game rm attached to my shop and I put a small window unit/heat pump in the wall. It stays comfortable all year round. It get really hot here and we had a several day in the 20's this winter but it's insulated well. That might not be as cold or as hot as in some places but the unit I haze does not run that often and has a low cost rating. I'm planning on putting a larger unit in the shop area even though I do like to work with the garage door open. The door is insulated so I can run A/c in there. Just my .02.
I decided to finish the top with a number of coats of Danish oil, followed by a coat of wax. I applied the first coat of oil in the usual manner, making sure to cover the edges, and down the holes. I applied a coat oil to the top side of the shelf, as well. Wipe it on, let it sit wet for half-an-hour, then rub it off. Wait a day or two, add a second coat, and then again for a third.
Working with wood fresh from the log, this green woodworking project is the perfect introduction to edge tools and wood grain.  In the first week you will produce a three-legged stool using buck and “whip”saws for crosscutting the log to length; wedges and froes for splitting out leg stock; drawknife and spokeshaves at a shaving horse for shaping the legs; and using travishers, rounding planes and specialized rasps for shaping the seat.
Another aspect that might irk some buyers is the fact that the capacity of this bench is less than great outside of weight. The top’s surface area is a bit on the smaller end, though its length is more in line with larger models. The width though is less than two feet which can limit some projects. Similarly, the vice capacity is the second smallest on our list at 4 ½”, though this too can be modded with optional additions.

In the middle third of the course, you’ll build a tool tote that features dovetails joining bottom-to-end boards; rabbeted and copper-nail pinned side boards; shaped end panels and curved handles passing through angled mortises. This joiner’s tote also features a lift-out box for layout tools with lapped (or optionally dovetailed) corners and a sliding lid.


We're planning to have a tree cutting service come in and take out a couple of diseased trees in the back part of our lot and then hire someone else to dig out the stumps. These trees are at the base of a small rise, and we're thinking about cutting into the "hill" a little bit and making a low retaining wall, maybe 18" to 24" high. But that's just intended to move the shed back a bit from the house. (Our total lot size is only 5,616 feet with an 1,800 square foot house.) Landscaping change like this won't affect current drainage patters, but anything else might make it worse.
The book is well written and easy to read. The illustrations, I'm sure were excellent in 1914 and, are still adequite now. Most of the designs seemed repetitive, though. I wish more attention had been given to lashing materials. If you are looking for that you will find almost none here. The book was fun to read and provided enough inspiration to make my brother and me attempt a large hut.
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