It might not be the easiest project in this list, but if you already have some experience with wood cutting and joinery, it won’t be any hassle at all. Thanks to the extremely detailed instructions it shouldn’t really be a problem even if you’re not very familiar with woodworking. This could actually be a great project for refining your woodworking skills as a beginner!
I would say take the shed, you'll find some use for it. I have contemplated this question also. I have a 20' x 11' basement shop, thats quickly loosing space. If you live in an area with a harsh winters (say the midwest), does it make sense to heat the shop through the week if you are only working in the shop on the weekends? Or do you run the heaters just when you are working in the shop? What kind of heaters are recommended (radient, wood stove, etc.)?
We follow many traditional standards because they impart the work ethic of doing things right, emphasizing quality, attention to detail, considering impact and longevity, and working to high standards for lasting work.  Our instructors are experienced craftspeople who recognize the value of passing on their skill set to the next generation of woodworkers.  We strive to invite you into our community by connecting you with others who have a passion for craftsmanship.  
The Classic Workbench is simple to use. The leg vise is used primarily for working the edges of boards and the ends of narrower boards. This is self explanatory. To work the faces of boards along the grain, tap up the planing stop (don’t make it any higher than necessary) and butt the end of the board into the teeth of the stop. With the right technique you can plane across wide boards without repositioning the board. You usually don’t need to tap the opposite end of the board to engage it with the stop, but in some cases, especially with rougher stock, you may need to give a tap with your mallet. Working the faces of a stack of boards is extremely quick with the planing stop since you don’t have to open and close a vise constantly. To work across the face of a board, make yourself a doe’s foot and position it at the back corner of the board, holding it down with a holdfast. The doe’s foot is simply a piece of wood with a V-shaped notch cut into one end. The bottomsurface of the doe’s foot can be lined with sandpaper or Crubber to help it stay put on the bench top. To work long boards, fasten a batten to the right leg with a holdfast and use that to support the end of the long board. We’ve found that a deadman is not necessary for the majority of work, especially on a bench of this length. For working the ends of smaller boards the leg vise can be used, but for precision work like dovetailing, we use and recommend our Moxon Vise.
On completion, you will graduate with a set of self-made tools, fixtures and storage units (not to mention the skills required to build them) that will serve and last you the rest of your life. You’ll be amply prepared to continue your woodworking education into specific trades such as architectural woodworking (finish work); custom door and window construction; solid-wood furniture and cabinetry; and boatbuilding. Over the course, we invite guest lecturers from the community to share their experience of becoming vocational woodworkers in these trades. 
Rocking horses, toy chests and dollhouses are just a few of the classic gifts generations have treasured. Now you can give all the pint-sized DIYers on your list those same classic gifts, and make them yourself with the help of these DIY toy kits. They're perfect for kids of all ages, and will be treasured for years to come. The best part? All these gifts can still make it to your door by Christmas.

Whether you're just starting out or wish to upgrade your important hand tools, this 5-Pc. Professional Woodworking Kit with matching rosewood and brass accents has all the essentials for producing the very best work. This fine set includes a 9" smoothing plane, 6" block plane, 9" try square, 9" marking gauge, 9" bevel gauge and a fitted wooden case.
This class is open to novice woodworkers and to more experienced woodworkers who would like to broaden (or simplify) their approach to woodworking. What do we mean by novice? We think it means you are a person who has decided to commit to learning new skills; to growing a passion for the craft of working with wood; and has a strong sense of the limitations of your own knowledge.
Quality is what we do, YOU will do it too, from day one. We will teach you all stages from choosing hand tools, to picking out wood, to developing your drawings, and building a portfolio of work. There are lots of workshop schools, courses, and magazines that are great for showing you an amateur way of getting a good result. An amateur has no excuse for poor work other than lack of understanding, the amateur has all day to get it right, the professional has not. They must do it right, first time, every day.
When you're working with linseed oil, never -- I mean NEVER -- leave used rags lying around. Hang them up outside, away from anything combustible, and where there's enough air circulation to keep them cool. Or put them in a bucket of water, and hang them outside later. If you're just setting a rag down for the moment, set it out flat, without folds, on something non-flammable. Hanging outside in the breeze, the oil in the rags won't retain heat while they oxidize. For the oil to completely oxidize can take in a couple of days, if it's warm, or more than a week, if it's cold and rainy. When fully oxidized, the oil will be solid and the rags will be stiff. At that point, they're safe, and can be thrown in the trash. Toss them in the trash before that, and you might as well say goodbye to your garage.
A better solution would have been to route a rabbet into the side, so that the added strip always had thickness. The way I did it means that the strip I glued in is very narrow, and hence very weak, at a certain point. In this case, that's not a problem, because it's going to be sitting under the countertop layer. I also noticed that because I had only clamped the strip down, and not into the edge, there was a noticeable glue gap where the strip butted up against the MDF. Again, in this application it isn't visible. But if I was doing something like this on the top of a table, I'd make sure to cut a clean rabbet, and to clamp both down and in.
I like the idea of re-inventing the wheel. I choose to believe that while others may have considered these improvements, they just never got around to trying them out. Brain gets bored with status quo. So, I try to keep Brain happy with the occasional foray into uncharted territory. And I must say Brain has had some really good results. Thanks, in part, to you, and the Roy. You never know where a good idea might come from so I’ll check in once in a while. That and make sure to build it in Sketchup first.
Learn how to use power tools, as well as traditional and modern hand tools, safely and effectively. Class assignments introduce basic concepts and techniques, to give you the skills needed for many woodworking projects such as mill board flattening and straightening, creating strong joints for connecting wood, and gluing boards together to make a panel. Students leave with a strong foundation for more advanced wood classes and a small end table. All tools for learning are provided.
This course will drill deep into the basics, beginning with a firm foundation in understanding wood as a material and incorporates introductory training in a wide range of techniques. You'll leave with a in depth experience of hand tools, practice applications of joinery methods, consider choices for wood selection and working with non-toxic materials, and understand practical planning for designing and executing woodworking projects.  The curriculum focuses on imparting skills through a series of projects designed to build on one another in techniques and complexity. 
Still in the building mood? Get free woodworking plans to build greenhouses, barns, pergolas, garages, dog houses, potting benches, router tables, playhouses, cabins, tree houses, gazebos, porch swings, picnic tables, swing sets, deer stands, bookcases, home bars, wine racks, decks, work benches, chicken coops, bird houses, benches, and even homes.
For a fun and comprehensive learning experience, take an online woodworking class in the WWGOA Academy. You’ll learn in-depth woodworking how-to, get bonus material, and enjoy custom benefits for class participants. You’ll never lose access to your Class; no strings attached! Check back often – as we’re adding new online woodworking classes regularly.
Dip your toes in the world of woodworking with our week-long courses, and by the end of the week, you'll be swimming. During these intensive, week-long woodworking courses, you will benefit from the guidance of our expert furniture makers, learning the basic principles of woodwork and cabinet making to professional standards. Hone your technique with our classes and create precise, beautiful work with our expertise, equipment and advice at your disposal.

The last thing is to semi-permanently attach the bolts for the vises. Given the amount of work necessary to get to the bolt heads, once the top is joined, I had intended to tighten them up so they wouldn't spin, and lock them that way with blue Loctite. (That's the strongest non-permanent grade.) That didn't work. What I found was that the bottoms of the countersinks weren't quite flat, and when I tightened the nuts down that far, the ends of the bolts would be pulled far enough out of alignment that the vise bases would no longer fit. In order for the vises to fit over the bolts, I had to leave the nuts loose enough that the bolts had a bit of wiggle - which meant that they were almost loose enough for the bolts to spin. So I put Loctite on the nuts, to keep them from unscrewing, and filled the countersinks with Liquid Nails, in hopes of keeping the bolts from spinning. I considered using epoxy, or a metal-epoxy mix like JB Weld, but I didn't have enough of either on hand. It seems to be working for now, though the real test won't be until I have to take the vises off.

You're not the first person to say this! I'm half inclined to use the Lowes shed as a starting point for my own design. But I do think I'd feel better if I could work as an "aprentice" next to an "old master". Someone at work is going to put me in touch with a guy who builds sheds for a living, and apparently he's competitive with the prices @ Lowes and HD. The Lowes shed comes with a "Handman Package" that I don't want but would end up paying for, anyway. The "workbenches" were laughably flimsy.

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